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Current Educational Events

  1. Summer Graduate School Séminaire de Mathématiques Supérieures 2021: Microlocal Analysis: Theory and Applications (Virtual School)

    Organizers: Suresh Eswarathasan (Dalhousie University), Dmitry Jakobson (McGill University), Katya Krupchyk (University of California, Irvine), Stephane Nonnenmacher (Université de Paris XI)

    Microlocal analysis originated in the study of linear partial differential equations (PDEs) in the high-frequency regime, through a combination of ideas from Fourier analysis and classical Hamiltonian mechanics. In parallel, similar ideas and methods had been developed since the early times of quantum mechanics, the smallness of Planck’s constant allowing to use semiclassical methods. The junction between these two points of view (microlocal and semiclassical) only emerged in 1970s, and has taken its full place in the PDE community in the last 20 years. This methodology resulted in major advances in the understanding of linear and nonlinear PDEs in the last 50 years. Moreover, microlocal methods continue to find new applications in diverse areas of mathematical analysis, such as the spectral theory of nonselfadjoint operators, scattering theory, and inverse problems.

    Updated on Apr 13, 2021 03:49 PM PDT
  2. Summer Graduate School 2021 CRM-PIMS Summer School in Probability (Virtual School)

    Organizers: LEAD Louigi Addario-Berry (McGill University), Omer Angel (University of British Columbia), Alexander Fribergh (University of Montreal), Mathav Murugan (University of British Columbia), Edwin Perkins (University of British Columbia)
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    The Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, aka the randomly-weighted complete graph. Edge weights are indicated using grayscale. Six distinguished vertices have been randomly chosen; edges between those vertices are shaded black to form a "hidden signal".

    The courses in this summer school focus on mathematical models of group dynamics, how to describe their dynamics and their scaling limits, and the connection to discrete and continuous optimization problems.

    The phrase "group dynamics" is used loosely here -- it may refer to species migration, the spread of a virus, or the propagation of electrons through an inhomogeneous medium, to name a few examples. Very commonly, such systems can be described via stochastic processes which approximately behave like the solution of an appropriate partial differential equation in the large-population limit.

    Updated on Mar 24, 2021 01:52 AM PDT
  3. Summer Graduate School Sparsity of Algebraic Points (Virtual School)

    Organizers: Philipp Habegger (University of Basel), LEAD Hector Pasten (Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile)
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    The Corvaja-Zannier proof of Siegel's theorem using subspaces. Illustrated by Sofía Pastén Vásquez.

    The theory of Diophantine equations is understood today as the study of algebraic points in algebraic varieties, and it is often the case that algebraic points of arithmetic relevance are expected to be sparse.

    This summer school will introduce the participants to two of the main techniques in the subject: (i) the filtration method to prove algebraic degeneracy of integral points by means of the subspace theorem, leading to special cases of conjectures by Bombieri, Lang, and Vojta, and (ii) unlikely intersections through o-minimality and bi-algebraic geometry, leading to results in the context of the Manin-Mumford conjecture, the André-Oort conjecture, and generalizations. This SGS should provide an entry point to a very active research area in modern number theory.

    Updated on Mar 05, 2021 11:34 AM PST
  4. Workshop [Online] Workshop on Mathematics and Racial Justice

    Organizers: Caleb Ashley (Boston College), Ron Buckmire (Occidental College), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Monica Jackson (American University), LEAD Omayra Ortega (Sonoma State University), LEAD Robin Wilson (California State Polytechnic University, Pomona)
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    The overarching goal of the Workshop on Mathematics and Racial Justice is to explore the role that mathematics plays in today’s movement for racial justice. For the purposes of this workshop, racial justice is the result of intentional, active and sustained anti-racist practices that identify and dismantle racist structures and policies that operate to oppress, disenfranchise, harm, and devalue Black people. This workshop will bring together mathematicians, statisticians, computer scientists, and STEM educators as well as members of the general public interested in using the tools of these disciplines to critically examine and eradicate racial disparities in society. Researchers with expertise or interest in problems at the intersection of mathematics, statistics and racial justice are encouraged to participate. This workshop will take place over two weeks and will include sessions on Bias in Algorithms and Technology; Fair Division, Allocation, and Representation; Public Health Disparities; and Racial Inequities in Mathematics Education.

    Updated on Jun 17, 2021 09:49 AM PDT
  5. MSRI-UP MSRI-UP 2021: Parking Functions: Choose your own adventure

    Organizers: Federico Ardila (San Francisco State University), Duane Cooper (Morehouse College), Maria Franco (Queensborough Community College (CUNY); MSRI - Mathematical Sciences Research Institute), LEAD Rebecca Garcia (Sam Houston State University), Pamela Harris (Williams College), Candice Price (Smith College)

    The MSRI-UP summer program is designed to serve a diverse group of undergraduate students who would like to conduct research in the mathematical sciences.

    In 2021, MSRI-UP will focus on Parking Functions: Choose your own adventure. The research program will be led by Dr. Pamela E. Harris, Associate Professor of Mathematics at Williams College.

    Updated on Feb 05, 2021 01:42 PM PST